20th-22nd March

London, UK

Download Brochure

Day One
Wednesday March 21st, 2018

Day Two
Thursday March 22nd, 2018

08.00
Breakfast & Networking

09.00
Chairman’s Opening Remarks


Expanding Complement Therapeutics Beyond Orphan Diseases

09.15
Advances in Understanding of Disease Pathogenesis in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Open Up New Opportunities for Complement Therapeutics

  • Michael Holers Scoville Professor & Head, Division of Rheumatology, University of Colorado

Synopsis

  • Investigating the processes by which Rheumatoid Arthritis begins as a chronic mucosal inflammatory process prior to the development of clinically apparent arthritis
  • Inhibition to mitigate the earliest phases of arthritis development, a process which exhibits several features of a complement system-engaging immune complex disease
  • The severe glomerulonephritis that is found in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) has been ameliorated in several case reports using a complement inhibitor
  • New imaging approaches to characterising and quantitating local complement activation in the lupus kidney have been developed
  • Complement receptor engagement likely plays an important role in the generation of an interferon-alpha signature in lupus patients

09.45
Therapeutically Harnessing the Role of Complement in Infection – Complement Evasion Strategies Developed by Bacterial Pathogens

  • Anna Blom Professor of Medical Protein Chemistry, Lund University

Synopsis

  • Analysing the crucial role of complement in antimicrobial defence
  •  Identifying mechanisms allowing bacterial pathogens such as Streptococci to establish infection despite surveillance of the complement system
  • Exploring bacterial complement evasion molecules as vaccine candidates
  • Developing fusion proteins composed of complement inhibitors and fragments of immunoglobulins for treatment of infections

10.15
Dual blockade of complement C3/C5 and TLR/CD14 as a Novel Treatment Approach for Sepsis and SIRS.

  • Tom Mollnes Professor of Immunology and Leader, Complement Research Group, University of Oslo

Synopsis

  • Discovery of the soluble terminal complement complex (TCC) in normal human biological fluids based on a novel antibody (aE11) against activated C9
  • aE11 antibody cross-reaction with pigs, paving the way for large animal studies
  • Establishing a human whole blood model with an anticoagulant not interfering with the inflammatory reaction, enabling investigation of cross-talk in the inflammatory network ex vivo
  • Identification of the upstream complement (C3/C5) and the TLR CD14 molecule as key “bottle neck” molecules responsible for the inflammatory reaction induced both by Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, both in vitro and in vivo

10.45
Morning Refreshments & Networking


Applying Lessons Learned to the Next Generation of Complement Inhibitors

11.45
Coversin: The Role in the Treatment of Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria and Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

Synopsis

  • Coversin- A subcutaneous medicine shows promising results in the treatment of
  • Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria
  • Coversin has the advantage of being a patient self-administration medicine
  • Coversin begins pivotal Phase III trials in Q1 2018
  • Coversin also inhibits LTB4 allowing treatment of other orphan inflammatory diseases

12.15
Development of BIVV009 for the Treatment of Patients with Primary Cold Agglutinin Disease (CAgD)

Synopsis

  • For the treatment of CAgD and other CP mediated diseases, we developed antibody
    inhibitors of C1s, a CP specific serine protease
  • In a Ph1a/1b clinical study design, BIVV009 was tested for safety, tolerability, and
    pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in healthy volunteers (Ph1a) and in 4
    cohorts of patients, including CAgD (Ph1b)
  • In primary CAgD patients, analyses of serum and plasma hemolytic markers
    demonstrated that one month of BIVV009 dosing immediately prevented hemolysis,
    leading to a median hemoglobin increase of ~4 g/dL and precluding the need for
    transfusions in the 5 patients who were previously transfusion dependent

12.45
The Power of Complement Therapeutics: A Patient Perspective

Synopsis

  • Our diagnostic journey into a world of rare disease
  • Research and development of therapeutic drugs creating a foundation of hope for patients and caregivers to rely on
  • The power of complement therapeutic drugs and the influence they have on a rare disease community

13.15
Lunch & Networking

14.15
Cytotopic Complement Inhibitors – Mechanisms and Insights

  • Richard Smith Director, Protein Therapeutics Laboratory, King’s College London

Synopsis

  • Complement regulation is primarily a cell-surface phenomenon yet complement inhibitors in current development act in bulk solution
  • The rise of Mirococept, an engineered fragment of CR1, Mr ~24kDa, which retains factor I cofactor and decay acceleration activities, binding to cells
  • Mirococept has been manufactured on an industrial scale to cGMP and has passed relevant safety and ADME tests
  • Tests in ~150 human subjects by several routes including ex-vivo perfusion of organs for transplantation and is well tolerated up to 100mg iv
  • A Phase II study in renal transplantation using ex-vivo perfusion has enrolled 80 patients so far – endpoints are DGF incidence and renal function
  • Several other types of agent have been cytotopically modified and are under investigation

14.45
Panel: Balancing Benefits and Risks by Assessing Optimum Inhibition Levels for Key Diseases

  • Michael Holers Scoville Professor & Head, Division of Rheumatology, University of Colorado
  • Michael Kirschfink Professor of Immunology, University of Heidelberg
  • Paul Morgan Professor of Immunology and Director, Systems Immunity Research Institute, Cardiff University

Synopsis

  • Identifying trends in the variance of optimum inhibition across different pathways
  • Determining which animal models companies have found most and least successful

15.15
Afternoon Refreshments & Networking


Safety Profiles, Risk and Managing Adverse Effects

15.45
Approaches to Computational Modelling of the Complement System

Synopsis

  • Comparison between computational models and traditional methods
  • Analysing Assumptions and limitations
  • Potential application in safety assessment, target selection, patient stratification, trial simulation

16.15
Details of this presentation aren’t available at this stage, please check back for further details.

16.45
Chairman’s Closing Remarks

  • Paul Morgan Professor of Immunology and Director, Systems Immunity Research Institute, Cardiff University

17.00
Close of Summit